Irresistible

Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked by Adam Alter

HM 851 .A437 2017

“Welcome to the age of behavioral addiction – an age in which half of the American population is addicted to at least one behavior. We obsess over our emails, Instagram likes, and Facebook feeds; we binge on TV episodes and YouTube videos; we work longer hours each year; and we spend an average of three hours each day using our smartphones. Half of us would rather suffer a broken bone than a broken phone, and Millennial kids spend so much time in front of screens that they struggle to interact with real, live humans.

In this revolutionary book, Adam Alter, a professor of psychology and marketing at New York University, tracks the rise of behavioral addiction, and explains why so many of today’s products are irresistible. Though these miraculous products melt the miles that separate people across the globe, their extraordinary and sometimes damaging magnetism is no accident. The companies that design these products tweak them over time until they become almost impossible to resist.

By reverse engineering behavioral addiction, Alter explains how we can harness addictive products for the good – to improve how we communicate with each other, spend and save our money, and set boundaries between work and play – and how we can mitigate their most damaging effects on our well-being, and the health and happiness of our children.”
– publisher description

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Ctrl + Z

Ctrl + Z: The Right to be Forgotten by Meg Leta Jones

K 3264 .C65 J66 2016

“‘The Internet never forgets.’
That’s the adage of the Digital Age, a time when the information we share or is collected threatens to linger forever. The Internet is full of personal data from our pasts that can haunt our futures. The consequences can be serious, affecting relationships, employment, academic success, and any number of other unforeseeable opportunities.

One possible solution to this threat is a digital right to be forgotten. Such a right, like the one established in the European Union, could mean that Google (and other Internet entities) would have a legal duty to delete, hide, or anonymize information at the request of users from around the world. Critics of the idea say that it’s an attack on free speech and open access and that it is technologically impossible. What does a digital right to be forgotten mean for the United States and the global Internet community?

Ctrl + Z breaks down the debate and provides guidance for a way forward. Our existing perspectives, it argues, are too limited: we imagine that we can either easily forget everything or that we can forget nothing at all. By looking at new theories of privacy and organizing the many potential applications of law and technology, scholar Meg Leta Jones offers us a new set of nuanced choices. And to help us choose, she provides a digital information life cycle, reflects on particular legal cultures, and analyzes international interoperability. In the end, Jones argues, the right to be forgotten can be innovative, liberating, and globally viable.”
– publisher description

Pressed for Time

Pressed for Time

Pressed for Time: The Acceleration of Life in Digital Capitalism by Judy Wajcman

HM 656 .W35 2015

“The technologically tethered, iPhone-addicted figure is an image we can easily conjure. Most of us complain that there aren’t enough hours in the day and there are too many e-mails in our thumb-accessible inboxes. This widespread perception that life is faster than it used to be is now ingrained in our culture, and smartphones and the Internet are continually being blamed. But isn’t the sole purpose of the smartphone to give us such quick access to people and information that we’ll be free to do other things? Isn’t technology supposed to make our lives easier?

In Pressed for Time, Judy Wajcman explains why we immediately interpret our experiences with digital technology as inexorably accelerating everyday life. She argues that we are not mere hostages to communication devices, and the sense of always being rushed is the result of the priorities and parameters we ourselves set rather than the machines that help us set them. Indeed, being busy and having action-packed lives have become valorized by our productivity-driven culture. Wajcman offers a bracing historical perspective, exploring the commodification of clock time and how the speed of the industrial age became identified with progress. She also delves into the ways time use differs for diverse groups in modern societies, showing how changes in work patterns, family arrangements, and parenting all affect time stress. Bringing together empirical research on time use and theoretical debates about dramatic digital developments, this accessible and engaging book will leave readers better versed in how to use technology to navigate life’s fast lane.”
– publisher description

How Google Works

How Google Works

How Google Works by Eric Schmidt & Jonathan Rosenberg
with Alan Eagle

HD 9696.8 .U64 S36 2015

How Google Works is an entertaining, page-turning primer containing lessons that Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg have learned while helping grow Google from a young start-up to a global icon. Using anecdotes from Google’s corporate history, How Google Works covers everything that managers need to know to be successful in the digital age:

  • corporate culture
  • talent
  • communication
  • dealing with disruption
  • strategy
  • decision-making
  • innovation

Schmidt and Rosenberg explain how technology – the internet, mobile and cloud computing – has shifted the balance of power from companies to consumers. The companies that will thrive in this ever-changing landscape will be the ones that create superior products and attract a new breed of employees whom the authors dub ‘smart creatives.'”
– publisher description

The End of College

The End of College

The End of College: Creating the Future of Learning and the University of Everywhere by Kevin Carey

LC 5800 .C36 2015

“Over the span of just nine months in 2011 and 2012, the world’s most famous universities and high-powered technology entrepreneurs began a race to revolutionize higher education. College courses that for centuries had been kept from all but an elite few were released to millions of students throughout the world – for free.

Exploding tuition prices and a flagging global economy, combined with the derring-do of a few intrepid innovators, have created a dynamic climate for a total rethinking of an industry that has remained virtually unchanged for more than a century. In The End of College, Kevin Carey, an education researcher and writer, draws on years of in-depth reporting and cutting-edge research to paint a vivid and surprising portrait of the future of education. Carey explains how two trends – the skyrocketing cost of college and the revolution in information technology – are converging in ways that will radically alter the college experience, upend the traditional meritocracy, and emancipate hundreds of millions of people around the world.

Insightful, innovative, and accessible, The End of College is a must-read, and an important contribution to the developing conversation about education in this country.”
– publisher description

Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous

Hacker Hoaxer Whistleblower Spy

Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous by Gabriella Coleman

HV 6773 .C646 2014

“Here is the ultimate book on the worldwide movement of hackers, pranksters, and activists that operates under the non-name Anonymous, by the writer the Huffington Post says ‘knows all of Anonymous’ deepest, darkest secrets.’

Half a dozen years ago, anthropologist Gabriella Coleman set out to study the rise of this global phenomenon just as some of its members were turning to political protest and dangerous disruption (before Anonymous shot to fame as a key player in the battles over WikiLeaks, the Arab Spring, and Occupy Wall Street). She ended up becoming so closely connected to Anonymous that the tricky story of her inside-outside status as Anon confidante, interpreter, and erstwhile mouthpiece forms one of the themes of this witty and entirely engrossing book.

The narrative brims with details unearthed from within a notoriously mysterious subculture, whose semi-legendary tricksters – such as Topiary, tflow, Anachaos, and Sabu – emerge as complex, diverse, politically and culturally sophisticated people. Propelled by years of chats and encounters with a multitude of hackers, including imprisoned activist Jeremy Hammond and the double agent who helped put him away, Hector Monsegur, Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy is filled with insights into the meaning of digital activism and little understood facets of culture in the Internet age, including the history of “trolling,” the ethics and metaphysics of hacking, and the origins and manifold meanings of “the lulz.””
– publisher description

Speed Limits: Where Time Went and Why We Have So Little Left

Speed Limits

Speed Limits: Where Time Went and Why We Have So Little Left by Mark C. Taylor

CB 478 .T39 2014

“We live in an ever-accelerating world: faster computers, markets, food, fashion, product cycles, minds, bodies, kids, lives. When did everything start moving so fast? Why does speed seem so inevitable? Is faster always better?

Drawing together developments in religion, philosophy, art, technology, fashion, and finance, Mark C. Taylor presents an original and rich account of a great paradox of our times: how the very forces and technologies that were supposed to free us by saving time and labor now trap us in a race we can never win. The faster we go, the less time we have, and the more we try to catch up, the farther behind we fall. Connecting our speed obsession with today’s global capitalism, he composes a grand narrative showing how commitments to economic growth and extreme competition, combined with accelerating technological innovation, have brought us close to disaster. Psychologically, environmentally, economically, and culturally, speed is taking a profound toll on our lives.

By showing how the phenomenon of speed has emerged, Taylor offers us a chance to see our pace of life as the product of specific ideas, practices and policies. It’s not inevitable or irreversible. He courageously and movingly invites us to imagine how we might patiently work toward a more deliberative life and sustainable world.”
– publisher description